Environmental Engineering

Xie wins grant to help extend shelf life of biological samples

Two samples of the super-absorbent polymer beads Xing Xie is developing to improve diagnostic tests on biological samples in far-flung places. These beads, roughly half a millimeter in size, have been dyed so they're easier to see. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Xing Xie has been developing a new environmental sampling technique that he thinks could have an unexpected application: preserving biological samples for transport to diagnostic facilities.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Haynes combines environmental and mechanical engineering in award-winning undergrad research

Environmental engineering senior Megan Haynes, center, with her mechanical engineering collaborators Andrey Gunawan, left, and Shannon Yee. Haynes has been doing research on desalination that recently won her second place in an American Society of Mechanical Engineers paper competition. (Photo Courtesy: Megan Haynes)

Environmental engineering senior Megan Haynes believes in the power of relationships. Maybe that explains why a challenge from her thermodynamics instructor in the fall has turned into a fruitful partnership with a mechanical engineering mentor and led her to reconsider where the future may lead.

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Konstantinidis named Maulding Faculty Fellow

Kostas Konstantinidis, the new Maulding Faculty Fellow in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Karen and John Huff School Chair Donald Webster has named Kostas Konstantinidis the Maulding Faculty Fellow in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Monday, July 9, 2018

Brown named new Carlton S. Wilder Assistant Professor

Joe Brown, who is the new Carlton S. Wilder Assistant Professor in the School as of July 1. (Photo: Gary Meek)

Joe Brown has been appointed the newest Carlton S. Wilder Assistant Professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Monday, June 25, 2018

Karthikeyan’s research uncovering a new oil-eating microbe wins top student award at Gulf oil spill conference

Pensacola Beach in the Florida Panhandle, one of the areas where oil washed ashore after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010. (Photo Courtesy: Smruthi Karthikeyan)

Ph.D. student Smruthi Karthikeyan has returned from a gathering of scientists studying the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill with the top award for student research.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

The next frontier in environmental engineering: Brown tackles public health issues through the microscope

"The next frontier in environmental engineering: Brown tackles public health issues." Joe Brown and a student test environmental samples in his lab. (Photo: Gary Meek, Design: Sarah Collins)

Joe Brown’s research is largely focused on water contamination and its impact on public health. He travels to communities around the world measuring microbes in each environment to gather exposure data and determines what it means for the health and safety of residents. In a recent trip to India, Brown found aerosolized Giardia and Salmonella, pathogens not normally known to be transmitted via air. This discovery creates a new challenge in environmental engineering, one where microbes associated with water and sanitation are transmitted via the air (aerosols), potentially leading to new pathways of disease transmission.

Monday, December 11, 2017

New CDC-sponsored research seeks to understand water-related risks of antibiotic use in agriculture

Several chickens walking on a leaf and stick-covered area in Hapeville, Georgia. Joe Brown and a team of Georgia Tech researchers have received a grant from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to study how antibiotic use on poultry farms might impact waterways near and downstream from the farms. They will collect samples in north Georgia to measure antibiotic resistance genes and resistant pathogens in the environment. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

A group of Georgia Tech researchers has received $340,000 from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to better understand how poultry feeding operations in Georgia potentially introduce antibiotic-resistant pathogens into the nearby environment.

Monday, October 23, 2017

Waste reuse strategies could take a big bite out of greenhouse gas emissions in China’s cities

Air pollution hangs over a portion of Beijing, China. A new study by researchers from Georgia Tech, the University of Minnesota, Yale University and partners in China finds that cities could cut greenhouse gas emissions by a third, significantly improving air quality and health, by adopting a series of strategies to reuse industrial waste. (Photo Courtesy: Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota)

Cities in China could cut greenhouse gas emissions by more than a third if they were to adopt a series of strategies that reuse industrial byproducts for things like heating or construction material.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

New faculty member Xing Xie works to clean water by killing bad microbes and harnessing the power of useful ones

New faculty member Xing Xie stands in the lobby of the Ford Environmental Science and Technology Building. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Xing Xie's work takes a two-pronged approach to environmental engineering: “One is the material; the other is the microbe," he said.

Friday, August 18, 2017

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