Environmental Engineering

NSF funds two new projects to understand greenhouse gas emissions from soil, expand microbial big-data analysis tools

Microbes in soil can break down nitrous oxide, N2O, into harmless nitrogen, N2, but they don't always do a good job, according to Professor Kostas Konstantinidis. He has a new grant from the National Science Foundation to understand why. The problem is that the nitrous oxide is a powerful and damaging greenhouse gas. The study will focus on agricultural land, where nitrogen is often added to soil as fertilizer, and tropical forests. (Image Courtesy: Kostas Konstantinidis)

Kostas Konstantinidis has received two new grants from the National Science Foundation that promise to help researchers better understand some of the tiniest organisms on the planet.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Genomic study of 412 anthrax strains provides new clues about why some strains are more virulent than others

A photomicrographic view of Bacillus anthracis bacteria taken from heart blood and processed using a carbol-fuchsin stain. (Image Courtesy: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

By analyzing genomic sequences from more than 400 strains of the bacterium that causes anthrax, researchers have provided the first evidence that the severity — technically known as virulence — of specific strains may be related to the number of copies of certain plasmids they carry. Plasmids are genetic structures of the cell that can reproduce independently, and are responsible for producing the anthrax toxin and other virulence factors.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

NWRI fellowship boosts Zhou’s work on non-chlorine approach to water disinfection

Ph.D. student Jianfeng Zhou, who has won a fellowship from the National Water Research Institute.

Second-year Ph.D. student Jianfeng Zhou has won a two-year fellowship from the National Water Research Institute to support his work using low-voltage electricity to disinfect water.

Thursday, July 26, 2018

Xie wins grant to help extend shelf life of biological samples

Two samples of the super-absorbent polymer beads Xing Xie is developing to improve diagnostic tests on biological samples in far-flung places. These beads, roughly half a millimeter in size, have been dyed so they're easier to see. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Xing Xie has been developing a new environmental sampling technique that he thinks could have an unexpected application: preserving biological samples for transport to diagnostic facilities.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Haynes combines environmental and mechanical engineering in award-winning undergrad research

Environmental engineering senior Megan Haynes, center, with her mechanical engineering collaborators Andrey Gunawan, left, and Shannon Yee. Haynes has been doing research on desalination that recently won her second place in an American Society of Mechanical Engineers paper competition. (Photo Courtesy: Megan Haynes)

Environmental engineering senior Megan Haynes believes in the power of relationships. Maybe that explains why a challenge from her thermodynamics instructor in the fall has turned into a fruitful partnership with a mechanical engineering mentor and led her to reconsider where the future may lead.

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Konstantinidis named Maulding Faculty Fellow

Kostas Konstantinidis, the new Maulding Faculty Fellow in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Karen and John Huff School Chair Donald Webster has named Kostas Konstantinidis the Maulding Faculty Fellow in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Monday, July 9, 2018

Brown named new Carlton S. Wilder Assistant Professor

Joe Brown, who is the new Carlton S. Wilder Assistant Professor in the School as of July 1. (Photo: Gary Meek)

Joe Brown has been appointed the newest Carlton S. Wilder Assistant Professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Monday, June 25, 2018

Karthikeyan’s research uncovering a new oil-eating microbe wins top student award at Gulf oil spill conference

Pensacola Beach in the Florida Panhandle, one of the areas where oil washed ashore after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010. (Photo Courtesy: Smruthi Karthikeyan)

Ph.D. student Smruthi Karthikeyan has returned from a gathering of scientists studying the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill with the top award for student research.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Pages

Subscribe to Environmental Engineering