Construction and Infrastructure Systems Engineering

Smart Cities: Innovative approaches combining engineering, technology and the social sciences are boosting the urban IQ

Smart Cities graphic with a rendering of the city of Atlanta.

Georgia Tech has been intensifying its smart cities initiative, including membership in the national MetroLab Network and the launch of a new faculty council with members from more than a dozen university units. Tech has long been working in the, but the now the Institute is organizing all the research that’s happening to have a bigger impact.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Researchers work to make robots the first-responders after nuclear power plant disasters

International Atomic Energy Agency fact-finding team leader Mike Weightman examines Reactor Unit 3 at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on May 27, 2011. The team assessed damage from an earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 that caused three reactors at the plant to meltdown. (Photo: Gregg Webb / International Atomic Energy Agency)

Disasters at nuclear power plants present all kinds of problems for search and rescue teams, from lethal radiation exposure to danger from weakened structures. Associate Professor Yong Cho has begun work on a new project that could one day put robots on the ground in the immediate aftermath of a meltdown or other catastrophe, helping to rescue people trapped in the plant and contain dangerous nuclear material in situations where quick action is critical.

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Change agent: Many resist change, but John Taylor has made a career studying it

John E. Taylor, the new Frederick L. Olmsted Profession in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

John E. Taylor joined the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the summer of 2016 as the inaugural Frederick L. Olmsted Professor. Taylor studies the dynamics where human and engineered networks meet, making him an ideal fit for an endowed professorship named for the father of landscape architecture and a designer who believed engineered infrastructure should be both functional and aesthetically appealing, serving society’s needs while also creating more livable and healthy communities.

Monday, December 12, 2016

Clough elected to National Academy of Construction

G. Wayne Clough with National Academy of Construction President Hugh Rice. Clough was inducted into the academy's 2016 class of new members Oct. 20. (Photo Courtesy: National Academy of Construction)

Georgia Tech President Emeritus G. Wayne Clough has a new accolade to add to his long list of honors: member of the National Academy of Construction.

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Failing infrastructure: We can’t fix it all, so Chloe Johansen’s research will help us prioritize

Ph.D. student Chloe Johansen meets with her TI:GER program group in October 2016 to talk about their project. (Photo: Joshua Stewart)

Chloe Johansen, a School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student, is working on an idea with Assistant Professor Iris Tien they think will make a difference in improving America's crumbling infrastructure. It's work with so much potential that Johansen is working with other Georgia Tech and Emory University graduate students to commercialize her research.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Self-taught roboticist Dimitri Seneca Snowden donates his creation to Cho’s construction engineering research lab

Associate Professor Yong Cho and Dimitri Seneca Snowden with the robot Snowden has donated to Cho's research lab.

For people of a certain generation (sorry Millennials!), the new robot occasionally roaming the halls of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering might look a little familiar.

Friday, May 13, 2016

Toward ‘greener’ concrete: Kurtis article in MRS Bulletin focuses on innovations in producing the ubiquitous material

Cover of MRS Bulletin December 2015 special issue

Kimberly Kurtis surveys innovations in cement-based materials and efforts to improve the sustainability of concrete in a new article published in a December 2015 special issue of MRS Bulletin. The issue celebrates 40 years of the journal from the Materials Research Society. Editors invited Kurtis’ to explore recent developments in the design of concrete as part of the issue’s focus on the interplay between materials and engineering and how that relationship is driving innovations in materials.

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

How software, sensors and mobile alerts could make one of the nation’s most dangerous industries safer

Researchers in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering are working to change the way construction companies plan for safety on the jobsite. Their work has the potential to save millions of dollars and some of the hundreds of lives lost on construction sites each year.

Friday, September 25, 2015

Tien wins NSF funding to improve reliability of our interdependent infrastructure

The National Science Foundation has awarded Iris Tien $499,920 for a three-year project that will develop new computer models of infrastructure systems and the connections between them. The idea is to create a model that can be used for any infrastructure system — water, power, transportation, or communications, for example — and takes into account each component of the system as well as how the system interacts with other infrastructure.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Concrete that can clean itself or purify the air? Christian Science Monitor story highlights Kurtis’ research

In a story July 24 about advances in concrete technology, the Christian Science Monitor talked to the School's Kim Kurtis about her work with titanium dioxide in the ubiquitous material used for roads, bridges and buildings.

Monday, July 27, 2015

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