National Science Foundation

Danger in the air? Brown wins NSF CAREER grant to find out

Assistant Professor Joe Brown has won an Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation. These so-called CAREER grants recognize promising young faculty with funds to help them establish the research director of their careers. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

When Joe Brown went to India last summer, he was hoping to collect samples that could help answer some questions he’d been thinking about for a while. His years studying sanitation and global health had given him the idea that the open sewers and overflowing latrines common in the dense cities of the developing world could be linked with disease through an unusual mechanism: airborne transmission of pathogens.

Friday, February 24, 2017

Building healthier cities: 10 questions with Ted Russell

Howard T. Tellepsen Chair Armistead "Ted" Russell (Photo: Justen Clay/Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine)

Tech Environmental Engineering Professor Armistead “Ted” Russell has traveled the world, including China, India and Minneapolis, studying air quality and its impacts on urban life. He is also part of a team of scientists, policymakers and industrialists working with a U.S. National Science Foundation Sustainability Research Network to build better cities.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Dealing with uncertainty: New NSF project will create more accurate, faster interval-based approach to assessing structures for damage

Yang Wang and students in his research group install sensors on a bridge in Bartow County, Georgia, in July 2016. Wang, Francesco Fedele and Rafi Muhanna in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering will use data from instruments like these to feed a new interval-based optimization approach to assess structural systems and detect damage. (Photo Courtesy: Yang Wang)

The National Science Foundation has funded a new collaboration between three School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers that could make finding damage in bridges or buildings easier and help reduce life-threatening failures. If successful, the team will be able to produce more reliable predictions about how structures behave, and their algorithm will be able to do the predictions much more quickly than current practice for structural damage and deterioration assessments.

Friday, November 4, 2016

New model explains how soil erosion affects the amount of carbon in Earth’s atmosphere

Yannis Dialynas, a hydrology Ph.D. student in Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Georgia Tech Provost Rafael L. Bras, discuss a model of soil erosion. This research is studying the role of erosion on carbon cycling. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A high-resolution model of how soil erosion impacts the carbon cycle of a small South Carolina watershed may help explain an apparent imbalance in the world’s carbon budget. Explaining that apparent imbalance is necessary for understanding and predicting the course of global climate change.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Geary, Mast win NSF graduate fellowships

Georgene Geary and Laura Mast, winners of NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

Two School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. students have secured National Science Foundation fellowships, some of the most competitive and prestigious funding for the nation’s graduate students. Georgene Geary and Laura Mast join a long list of the brightest and most promising of the School’s students to win the funding. This year, NSF chose to support fewer than one in eight applicants.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Arson, Suryanarayana win sought-after CAREER awards from NSF

Chloe Arson and Phanish Suryanarayana, winners of CAREER awards from the NSF.

Two assistant professors in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering have won one of the nation’s premiere grants and the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious award for junior faculty, the Early Career Development award. Chloe Arson and Phanish Suryanarayana learned of their selection in early January for what are known simply as CAREER awards. The grants recognize the top educators and researchers in the country, those who “exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research,” according to the NSF.

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Tien wins NSF funding to improve reliability of our interdependent infrastructure

The National Science Foundation has awarded Iris Tien $499,920 for a three-year project that will develop new computer models of infrastructure systems and the connections between them. The idea is to create a model that can be used for any infrastructure system — water, power, transportation, or communications, for example — and takes into account each component of the system as well as how the system interacts with other infrastructure.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

DesRoches joins NSF’s engineering advisory committee

School Chair Reginald DesRoches will join the National Science Foundation’s Advisory Committee for Engineering this fall. Engineering Directorate officials invited DesRoches to serve a three-year term starting in October, at the committee’s fall meeting.

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

NSF funds $12M research network to build the healthy, sustainable, livable cities of the future

How will we build the cities of the future in a sustainable way? A new National Science Foundation-funded research network will connect scientists at nine universities with infrastructure groups, public policy experts, and industry partners to reimagine cities. Georgia Tech will be an anchor of the $12 million network, which will be led by the University of Minnesota, and School of Civil and Environmental Engineering professor Ted Russell will serve as a co-director.

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Using nature’s roadmap: Frost helps lead new NSF center that could change the face of geotechnical engineering

An $18.5 million investment from the National Science Foundation will help researchers at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech — along with colleagues at Arizona State, New Mexico State, and the University of California, Davis — tap into the lessons nature teaches us and, potentially, revolutionize geotechnical engineering in the process.

Monday, August 10, 2015

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